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Why You Should Know Your Site Name Server?

When you type a domain name in the address bar of your browser, this is what happens. At first, the DNS resolver cache is looked up to find if there is an answer cached. If there is no cached answer it moves on to its configured name servers. The root DNS server decides which Top Level Domain (TLD) name servers the DNS resolver should contact. The TLD name server decides which Authoritative DNS server is responsible for the domain and passes this information back to the DNS resolver. The Authoritative DNS then looks up the record for that specific domain and sends it back to your browser.

What Is A Name Server and How Does this Work?

A name server translates human-readable domains to IP addresses.

Name servers are responsible for translating human-readable domains to IP addresses. DNS is a hierarchical system of machines that keep track of information about the Internet, such as domain names and IP addresses.

A name server locates a domain by performing an authoritative lookup on its database, then returning the corresponding IP address if the lookup was successful. Without this functionality, you wouldn’t be able to type in any website URL on your browser because it wouldn’t know what server should handle your request (and therefore which IP address would correspond with it).

A recursive DNS server is another type of name server that performs lookups on behalf of other applications or consumers; these non-authoritative lookups can also be used by recursive resolvers themselves (for example when resolving queries from within their own software).

It is a very important part of the domain name system.

The Domain Name System (DNS) is the Internet’s directory system. It translates human-readable names, such as “www.example.com,” into numbers that computers can use to talk to each other over the Internet.

The DNS is an essential part of how you connect to websites on the internet, but sometimes it can get confusing when trying to figure out what your site name server is or where those servers are located. To help make this easier, we’ve created this handy guide!

When you type a domain name in the address bar of your browser, this is what happens.

When you type a domain name in the address bar of your browser, this is what happens:

  • The browser makes a request to the DNS resolver (the computer that resolves domain names).
  • The DNS resolver checks its cache first. If there is no answer cached, it will contact the name server and ask it to resolve the domain name for them (or if this fails as well).
  • Once they’ve got an answer from one of their authoritative servers, they forward them back down through some sort of hierarchy until they reach their final destination at which point everything works out fine!

At first, the DNS resolver cache is looked up to find if there is an answer cached.

When you’re looking up a domain name, the DNS resolver cache is looked up to find if there is an answer cached. If there isn’t one, then it will send a query to the name servers and they will then look up the record for that specific domain and send it back to your computer.

If there is no cached answer it moves on to its configured name servers.

When you visit a site, the name server checks your IP address against its cache. If it finds a cached answer for that query, then it will not send you any additional queries to its configured name servers.

However, if there is no cached answer for your IP address and you have configured DNS settings in your web browser (or any other software), then this means that you need to ask for an answer from one of these servers:

The root DNS server decides which Top Level Domain (TLD) name servers DNS resolver should contact. The root DNS server is the first DNS server that your computer will contact when it needs to resolve a DNS query. It’s also responsible for knowing where all the TLD name servers are located and what top-level domains (TLDs) they’re responsible for.

The TLD name server decides which Authoritative DNS server is responsible for the domain and passes this information back to the DNS resolver. The TLD name server is responsible for the domain. It passes back to the DNS resolver what it needs to do in order to resolve a hostname and tells it which Authoritative DNS server will allow you access to that resource.

The TLD name server can be thought of as the “parent” of all your domains since it controls them all by assigning them IP addresses and setting up their records on your registrar.

The Authoritative DNS then looks up the record for that specific domain and sends it back to your browser. The first thing to know about your domain name server is that it’s not the web host. It’s a separate piece of software that can be located anywhere in the world, including in your country or on another continent altogether.

The Domain Name Server (DNS) looks up the record for that specific domain and sends it back to your browser. It’s important because, without it, no one would ever know what IP address they should connect to when they want access to a site like yours! So make sure you’ve got at least one functioning DNS server before continuing with this lesson!

You should always know what your site name servers.

The DNS system is the backbone of the Internet, and it’s important to understand how it works so that you can troubleshoot when things go wrong. The most important part of this system is your site name server (also known as a forward lookup zone).

When someone types in your URL into their browser (e.g., https://example.com), the browser contacts your ISP’s DNS server with an inquiry about what IP address should be used for www., followed by another query for www. (something else).

CONCLUSION

In conclusion, you should always know what your site name server’s are because if you ever change hosting or even use multiple hosting companies, you will need them.